The Monday Let Down

Posted: May 9, 2011 in emotions, leadership, pastoral leadership
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Every pastor I know (including myself) lives for Sundays. We live for Sunday because we desire to see Jesus Christ  lifted up in worship and in the preaching of His word!  It’s our game day.  During the week we are praying, counseling, studying, writing, meeting with leadership, putting out fires and at times dealing with crisis in the lives of others. No matter what happens during the week, Sunday is still coming and while it’s not the only thing the church is about it is a major component.

Cue the Emotional Curtain to be Pulled Back)                                                                                  

As much as I love Sundays, Mondays are a huge let down. Let me explain. A pastor goes 90mph during the week and hits Sunday like a Mac Truck because he’s passionate about the church and what he believes God’s calling the church to. Monday’s are my current day off. For me Monday at times hangs on my like a wet coat…..a downer….a drag. There have been seasons when I felt like having a day off was pointless. I would have times when I didn’t even know how to use my day off. I would just sort of wander around the house or run errands that just seemed lame compared the overarching mission of leading and making disciples. When I feel that way, I hate it. I hate it because I know my wife and boys have to live with some of the residual effects of that Monday let down in my world. I’ve got to be intentional about making sure my view of my day of rest is not hooked up to that emotional roller-coaster that is pastoral ministry.

Bottom line:  God longs to be exalted in our Sundays and our Mondays. The ups and the downs. He’s just as present in both.

What about you? How are you managing the “let-downs” in your life? Are you allowing your emotions to rule you or are you digging deep into that shelter that is Christ Jesus?

Have a good Monday,

Nathan

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Comments
  1. Kirk says:

    Your transparency is amazing. And it is so healthy, and good for us to see you model transparency and vulnerability this way. Thanks for being so grounded and in touch with who you really are, and for being willing to pull aside that curtain now and then.

    • Nathan Rouse says:

      Kirk,

      Thanks Kirk! There’s a great quote from pastor and author, Peter Scazzero in his book, The Emotionally Healthy Church: “It’s better to lead out of brokeness than pretending to be whole.” I think as we keep it real we’ll find people being able to connect more easily to our leadership.

      N.

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